7.2 Magnitude Earthquake in Southern Alaska

A powerful 7.2 magnitude earthquake struck southern Alaska late Saturday, triggering a brief tsunami advisory that was later canceled, according

U.S. Geological Survey map of Alaskan quake and aftershocks. U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

A powerful 7.2 magnitude earthquake struck southern Alaska late Saturday, triggering a brief tsunami advisory that was later canceled, according to reports from monitoring bodies. The earthquake, which occurred south of Sand Point, Alaska, was widely felt across the Aleutian Islands, the Alaskan Peninsula, and Cook Inlet regions.

In Kodiak, Alaska, sirens blared, warning residents of a potential tsunami, leading many to seek shelter late at night. Videos posted on social media captured the urgency and response of the community.

Initially reported as a 7.4 magnitude earthquake, the United States Geological Survey later downgraded it to 7.2. The quake struck at 10:48 p.m. Saturday at a depth of 13 miles (21 kilometers). The U.S. National Weather Service issued a tsunami advisory for coastal Alaska from Chignik Bay to Unimak Pass, but later canceled it approximately an hour after the initial alert.

Tsunami waves were observed, with a maximum height of 0.5 feet, at King Cove and Sand Point around 12:18 a.m. local time. However, there were no reports of significant damage or widespread impacts.

Residents in Kodiak Island and the Kenai Peninsula were relieved to learn that the tsunami advisory did not apply to their areas, as confirmed by the National Weather Service in Anchorage.

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