BREAKING Mugshot Photo: Former President Trump Plans to Surrender Thursday on Election Fraud Charges, Settles Bond Agreement

UPDATE: Rudy Giuliani, once a prominent figure as New York City’s mayor, has now found himself at the center of

Donald Trump
Donald Trump, MEGA

UPDATE: Rudy Giuliani, once a prominent figure as New York City’s mayor, has now found himself at the center of legal proceedings. On a Wednesday afternoon in Atlanta, Giuliani surrendered himself, marking the beginning of a formal booking procedure. This process comes in response to 13 felony charges related to alleged election meddling in Georgia. The unfolding drama took place at the Fulton County Jail, where Giuliani’s mug shot has been captured as part of this significant legal chapter.

Former President Donald Trump is reportedly preparing to turn himself in to the Fulton County jail in Atlanta on Thursday, facing charges related to his alleged attempts to overturn the 2020 election. A reliable source familiar with his schedule revealed this intention, though it’s possible that the plan may change, as he has until midday Friday to comply.

The designated surrender date was established in conjunction with the terms of his consent bond and release conditions. His legal team reached an accord with Georgia authorities on Monday, agreeing to a $200,000 bond. However, Trump will only need to post $20,000 to remain free until his trial.

As part of the agreement, Trump committed not to engage in threatening or intimidating behavior towards potential witnesses, even on social media platforms. Failure to adhere to this stipulation could lead to pre-trial incarceration.

Donald Trump

In a post on his platform Truth Social, Trump commented, “Can you believe it? I’ll be going to Atlanta, Georgia, on Thursday to be ARRESTED,” while simultaneously targeting Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis.

Trump and his co-defendants have also been directed not to communicate with each other, except through their legal representatives, until the trial proceedings. The legal case hinges on Georgia’s racketeering statute.

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