World heavyweight champ Tyson Fury is hot off his victory in Las Vegas against Deontay Wilder, but he’s not giving up the spotlight any time soon. Fury has announced the launch of a new app, focused on providing content creators a troll-free platform from which to create. This new app, MY AAA, looks to address the mental health toll that free content platforms often take on their creators and users, and was inspired by Fury’s experience creating workout videos from home during the pandemic. 

MY AAA

Content creators often find themselves plagued by trolls and dealing with the mental health toll of people’s online abuse. During the pandemic, Fury realized how relentless these issues are as he uploaded videos to share his workout routine and keep people motivated. Fury came up with MY AAA as a way to create a more positive and healthy space for both creators and users, who can now interact on a basis that’s more comfortable for content creators which gives them more freedom to share parts of themselves. 

In a statement, Fury shared thoughts on the necessity of the app; “Mental health is very important to me and I’ve expressed my concerns about existing social media platforms quite openly. When this project came along, it seemed like the perfect way for me to have an enjoyable social media experience with my REAL supporters. I know it’s something a lot of people like me will really benefit from.”

The Director of MY AAA added, “With all the recent documented trolling and abuse on social media, it was really important for us to make this an enjoyable experience for the creators on the platform. It’s social media without the nonsense. Having millions of followers on Instagram is great but you are at the mercy of the platform and you can’t really control the experience of your audience. You can with AAA.”

So what is MY AAA? It’s a subscription social network that allows users behind-the-scenes access to their favorite creators for a monthly fee, including creators in the business of music, podcasting, sports, celebrity sphere, artists, actors, and influences from the fitness, beauty, and fashion industries. 

There won’t be ads or pressure for influencers to plug products they don’t support just to make a buck; the subscription fee gives them the freedom to create what they want, when they want. In some ways, it’s like OnlyFans; direct access to content for a reasonable subscription. 

Victory against Wilder

Tyson Fury

MY AAA is the newest buzz about Fury, but it’s not necessarily the biggest. This week, Fury won the WBC heavyweight world championship against Wilder, and declared himself the best heavyweight fighter of this era. BT reports, “There are still one or two challenges out there so his claim could be contested in some quarters. But having ended the reign of Wladimir Klitschko all those years ago and got the better of the hardest hitting heavyweight in modern times in two of three fights – many would argue all three – the 33-year-old Fury has a right to be bullish. This was not his most accomplished performance but his participation in a fight featuring five knockdowns smashes the myth he is only preoccupied on defence and ought to earn him an army of new fans.”

Fury will have to defend that claim in the coming years – or retire on top – but for now, he’s coasting high on his victory after showing fans he’s one of the best. Whether or not you agree with his assertion that he’s the best, he’s definitely a contender. 

Social Media Platforms Under Fire

Facebook

MY AAA comes just as social media is under fire for their handling of user privacy and online safety. Facebook has been under scrutiny after a whistleblower named Frances Haugen testified before Congress about claims that Facebook has been shirking its duty to its youngest and most vulnerable users. According to Haugen, Facebook is also aware of the mental health toll that social media takes on teenagers and hasn’t done anything to protect them. 

And that impact goes both ways; it also affects content creators. A platform like MY AAA would put more power in the hands of the creators and give them a safer platform from which to work. The app’s creation is timely in the face of the Facebook whistleblower. That whistleblower, by the way, has been joined by a second named Sophie Zhang who has offered to testify before Congress and claims to have turned over documents to law enforcement concerning potential crime violations. 

Haugen has said that she has no intention to harm Facebook or have it shut down, but wants them to take their duty to children and teens more seriously and beef up security. In essence, she wants them to do what they say they’re already doing. Zhang is a bit of a wild card in the dialogue; it’s unclear what she might reveal if put before Congress to testify, but she excoriated Facebook in a 7,800-word memo claiming that Facebook has knowingly allowed authoritarian regimes around the world to manipulate users accessing the platform. 

Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook founder and CEO, has denied the whistleblower claims and says Haugen is painting a false picture. Zuckerberg has, however, vowed to do better.